Effect of crossflow on Görtler instability in incompressible boundary layers
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Effect of crossflow on Görtler instability in incompressible boundary layers

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Published by Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering, NASA Langley Research Center, National Technical Information Service, distributor in Hampton, VA, [Springfield, Va .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Boundary layer flow.,
  • Boundary layer stability.,
  • Critical velocity.,
  • Cross flow.,
  • Goertler instability.,
  • Incompressible boundary layer.,
  • Pressure gradients.,
  • Reynolds number.,
  • Sweep angle.,
  • Three dimensional boundary layer.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesEffect of crossflow on Goertler instability in incompressible boundary layers.
StatementY.H. Zurigat, M.R. Malik.
SeriesICASE report -- no. 94-94., NASA contractor report -- 195007., NASA contractor report -- NASA CR-195007.
ContributionsMalik, Mujeeb R., Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15409991M

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Get this from a library! Effect of crossflow on Göertler instability in incompressible boundary layers. [Yousef H Zurigat; M R Malik; Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering.]. (PDF) EFFECT OF CROSSFLOW ON GORTLER INSTABILITY IN INCOMPRESSIBLE BOUNDARY LAYERS | Yousef H Zurigat - ABSTRACT Linear stability theory is used to study the effect of crossflow on C_rtler instability in incompressible boundary layers. The results cover a wide range of sweep angle, pressure gradient, and wall curvature parameters. Abstract Linear stability theory is used to study the effect of cross‐flow on Görtler instability in incompressible boundary layers. The results cover a wide range of sweep angle, pressure gradient, and wall curvature by: 5. Abstract In this paper, some results on the effect of cross flow on Görtler instability in incompressible boundary layers are presented. The results cover a wide range of sweep angles, pressure gradient, and wall curvature parameters.

Book Microform: National government publication: Microfiche: EnglishView all editions and formats: Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first. Subjects: Boundary layer flow. Cross flow. Goertler instability. View all subjects; More like this: Similar Items. The Effect of Crossflow on Gortler Vortices. In addition we consider the effect of an applied pressure gradient within the boundary layer on the instability mechanism and demonstrate that a. The first instability is usually called primary instability and it may consist of a two- or three-dimensional Tollmien Schlichting wave, a Gortler vortex, or a crossflow instability. The next two instabilities in the cascade are usually called secondary and tertiary instabilities. The effect of Görtler instability on hypersonic boundary layer transition Article (PDF Available) in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics Letters 6(2) March with 65 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Request PDF | Effect of wall cooling on compressible Gortler vortices | It is known that in adiabatic boundary layer flow over a curved surface the detailed structure of the spanwise periodic. The problem of the propagation of three-dimensional laminar instabilities, due to crossflow, in a three-dimensional compressible boundary layer, is examined using linear theory. The theory is applied to the case of a transonic swept wing. It is shown that compressibility has a mild stabilizing effect in the regions where the crossflow is strong. For the incompressible boundary layers, the results also show that T-S waves have connections with the secondary instability mode when the boundary layer is distorted by Klebanoff streaks. Summary. The paper addresses the accurate prediction of disturbance amplitudes and profiles due to localized surface roughness and wall-suction in incompressible swept-wing boundary layers subject to crossflow (CF) instability.