An oration, for the fourth of July, 1798
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An oration, for the fourth of July, 1798 delivered in the meeting-house, in the vicinity of Dartmouth-College, at Hanover, in Newhampshire, at the request of the inhabitants of said Hanover, and the adjacent towns, who assembled there for the celebration of the 22d anniversary of American independence, and published by their desire. by Josiah Dunham

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Published by by Benjamin True. in Printed at Hanover, Newhampshire .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementBy Josiah Dunham, A.M. ; [Five lines of quotations]
SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 33650.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination15, [1] p.
Number of Pages15
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14580798M

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